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Non-Disclosure Agreement

In business, there are numerous instances in which you have to share confidential information with another party. For example you have a business idea. In order to execute the idea you will have to share the idea with potential partners, investors or employees.

Startup companies with a new and profitable idea can only succeed if what they are working on remains under wraps. But the key to doing so safely is making sure that the other party is bound to respect the confidential information you provide them and not use it in a way that is detrimental for your business.

Inorder to keep a lid on the sensitive information, a non-disclosure agreement, or NDA, alternatively referred to as confidentiality agreements (CA), confidentiality statements, or confidentiality clauses is signed between two parties.

A Non-Disclosure Agreement is typically put to use while disclosing confidential information to potential investors, creditors, clients, or suppliers. Some people might not like the idea of signing a non-disclosure agreement saying “Don’t you trust me?” But without such a signed agreement, any information disclosed in trust can be used for malicious purposes or be made public accidentally. NDA is a promise between two or more parties that the information conveyed will be maintained in secrecy.

The confidentiality of the information is maintained for a specified period of time as mentioned in the agreement. But once the information is made public, that loses it’s “confidentiality” people will be free to disclose the information.

Types of Non-Disclosure Agreements:  

The specific content of each Non-disclaimer agreement is unique as it will relate to details of specific information, proprietary data involved and what is being discussed. In general there are two types of non-disclosure agreements.

  1. Unilateral Non-disclosure agreement: A unilateral agreement binds only one party to the agreement for example a company signs a unilateral non-disclosure agreement with an employee. Employee agrees not to disclose or reveal confidential information learnt while on the job. The majority of NDAs fall under these category and are intended to protect a business trade secret. Researchers and professors at research universities or at R&D department in the private sector are at times required to sign an NDA before they carry out research with the business or university that supports them.
  2. Mutual non-disclosure agreement: A mutual non-disclosure agreement is typically executed between two parties exploring a possible business arrangement or a joint venture or some other possible merger that might have a mutual benefit to both parties.7 Simple Ways You Can Protect Your Idea From Theft

 

What does it mean to have a copyright? How do you get something copyrighted?
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Copyright in the Digital Age

Copyright in the Digital Age: A Vital Tool for Artists

The modern Internet and Digital age has drastically changed the landscape of art industry. With the emergence of digital art software technology artists can create more work and can easily circulate their art regardless of their location.

Internet exposure has brought art to people all over the world, dramatically increasing the demographic and target audience. By simply designing an attractive website and by posting art in online stores, an artist can reach millions of people all from his home. An artist can serve as an inspiration for many budding artists throughout the world by posting tutorials and videos to share his knowledge.

In addition, potential clients and employers from anywhere can easily see the  portfolio of an artist and contact him with only a few mouse clicks.

In the face of technological advancement, copyright law has undergone continuous evolution. “Copyright” provides exclusive rights to the authors and artists in order to encourage the production of creative works. These exclusive rights are balanced by a range of limitations and exceptions that permit some uses of copyrighted works without the need for authorization. Copyright assures authors the right to their original expression, but encourages others to build freely upon the ideas and information conveyed by a work.

In this era of Internet and digitalization, copyright is an essential tool for the survival of an artist as it protects his creation and career. An artist may be too inspired by the work of another artist that he intentionally or unintentionally take on qualities of that artist’s work and fine line between inspiration and copying is often crossed.

In many cases, the aspiring artists may then too closely copy the style of an established artist and thus offer clients similar works at a much cheaper rate.

With modernization and computer revolution, Digital Piracy and Copyright Infringement has become very easy. So education and awareness about Intellectual Property infringement is something that is very important, especially in the art industry. An artist puts a lot of time and efforts in creating an art and how can anyone simply claim it as their’s and use it for their own needs without any permission granted whatsoever. Without a Copyright, art is susceptible to infringers.

Protect your Art by filing a copyright today.

What is a framework for innovation? What is the growth strategy?
band lawyer india, Business Administration, Business Models, Business Networking, Business Owner, Business Plans, Business Relationships, Business Strategy, Business-To-Business, IPR Companies, Digital Agencies, Ecommer, Copyright Lawyer India, intellectual property strategist, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGY, NBFCs lawyer India, patent lawyer, Startup Lawyer India, tech corp legal

From the “Idea phase” into the “Invention phase”

From the “Idea phase” into the “Invention phase”

Inspiration can be found anywhere if you look around and be open to it. Ideas are relatively easy to come. “Sit-at-tea-discussions”, which are now given a fancy term “brainstorming sessions” generate wonderful ideas. It takes a lot of knowledge, time, money and efforts to refine an idea into an invention.

2

But How do you begin with the idea process? First of all discover a problem. Take out a sheet of paper and write down whatever comes to your mind related to the problem; it doesn’t necessarily make sense and try to come up with a solution to the problem you just discovered. Only after you organize your initial idea, the actual design and development of your product will begin.

Turning an idea into  an invention — it takes lot of efforts and luck to launch a product into, and get that product accepted by, the marketplace. There are substantial barriers in the path of those who pursue innovation. Overcoming those barriers and accomplishing the tasks require careful planning and input from others.

You can’t just take an idea, plunk it down and say “OK, this is it.” You will be defining and tweaking your idea constantly even during development and prototyping.

Entrepreneurship can be a tough and long journey, and the success of your idea may be doubted by many people, even your family and friends! But remain focused on the value that your invention will deliver to your customers. You should be able to clearly explain the basic idea or concept behind your new product or service (in and out of the industry), have a prototype for demonstration of your new product or service, and you may seek professional advice to protect your intellectual property.

How will you determine if your idea will succeed?

One of the best ways to determine the success of your idea is to talk to people around, get customer feedback, before the complete development of the product/service and finalise your target market, pricing model and marketing strategy. Inorder to validate the entry of your product/service into the market carry out complete industrial trials for your product/service.

When you finally set out to launch your business, one of the most important trait you need as an entrepreneur is “Perseverance”. You’ll be told “no” many times but you’ve to move beyond the “no” and eventually, you’re going to get to a “yes.”

Understand that doing business isn’t a rocket science. No, it is definitely not easy to begin a business, but it’s not as complicated or as scary as many people think, either. It’s a step-by-step, common-sense procedure. So take one step at a time!!

 

Copyright protection extends only to expressions, and not to ideas, procedures, methods of operation or mathematical concepts
Copyright Lawyer India, intellectual property strategist, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGY

International Copyright Filing Services

Creativity is intelligence having fun. People admire intelligence, and they are always attracted to fun—so the combination is fantastic. Having said that one has to protect creativity by filing for copyright protection for the creative work. The purpose of filing international copyright application is to protect your Creativity in multiple countries which ACTS as an EVIDENCE in case of copyright work infringement.

International Copyright

 

Purpose of filing international copyright application is to protect your Creativity in multiple countries which ACTS as an EVIDENCE in case of copyright work infringement.

The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (1886) is an International Agreement which deals with the protection of the literary and artistic work of the authors. The Berne Convention has 174 contracting parties/member countries and works on three basic concepts-

i) Works originating in a member state receive the same protection in each of the other member states. This is called as the principle of “National Treatment”.

ii) Under Berne Convention, no preconditions or formalities are required for the protection of work  by law. This is known as the principle of “automatic protection”.

iii) According to the principle of “Independence of protection” the protection in each member state is governed by the state’s own domestic law i.e the legal protection of work in a country is independent of the existence of protection in the other country.

Copyright protection extends only to expressions, and not to ideas, procedures, methods of operation or mathematical concepts
What can be protected using copyright?

The protection of the literary and artistic work under Berne Convention is applicable to nationals and residents of countries that are member to the convention. To obtain a copyright in different countries which are member to the Berne Convention, copyright is to be filed simultaneously (within 30 days) in all the countries in which legal protection rights are to be obtained.

Member Nations to the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic works (1886)

Contracting Party Signature Instrument In Force Detail
Albania Accession: December 2, 1993 March 6, 1994 Details
Algeria Accession: January 19, 1998 April 19, 1998 Details
Andorra Accession: March 2, 2004 June 2, 2004 Details
Antigua and Barbuda Accession: December 17, 1999 March 17, 2000 Details
Argentina Accession: May 5, 1967 June 10, 1967 Details
Armenia Accession: July 19, 2000 October 19, 2000 Details
Australia Declaration of Continued Application: April 14, 1928 April 14, 1928 Details
Austria Accession: September 11, 1920 October 1, 1920 Details
Azerbaijan Accession: March 4, 1999 June 4, 1999 Details
Bahamas Declaration of Continued Application: July 5, 1976 July 10, 1973 Details
Bahrain Accession: November 29, 1996 March 2, 1997 Details
Bangladesh Accession: February 4, 1999 May 4, 1999 Details
Barbados Accession: March 16, 1983 July 30, 1983 Details
Belarus Accession: September 12, 1997 December 12, 1997 Details
Belgium September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Belize Accession: March 17, 2000 June 17, 2000 Details
Benin Declaration of Continued Application: January 3, 1961 August 1, 1960 Details
Bhutan Accession: August 25, 2004 November 25, 2004 Details
Bolivia (Plurinational State of) Accession: August 4, 1993 November 4, 1993 Details
Bosnia and Herzegovina Declaration of Continued Application: June 2, 1993 March 1, 1992 Details
Botswana Accession: January 15, 1998 April 15, 1998 Details
Brazil Accession: February 6, 1922 February 9, 1922 Details
Brunei Darussalam Accession: May 30, 2006 August 30, 2006 Details
Bulgaria Accession: December 5, 1921 December 5, 1921 Details
Burkina Faso Accession: April 26, 1963 August 19, 1963 Details
Burundi Accession: January 12, 2016 April 12, 2016 Details
Cabo Verde Accession: April 7, 1997 July 7, 1997 Details
Cameroon Declaration of Continued Application: September 21, 1964 January 1, 1960 Details
Canada Declaration of Continued Application: April 10, 1928 April 10, 1928 Details
Central African Republic Accession: May 31, 1977 September 3, 1977 Details
Chad Accession: August 4, 1971 November 25, 1971 Details
Chile Accession: April 9, 1970 June 5, 1970 Details
China Accession: July 10, 1992 October 15, 1992 Details
Colombia Accession: December 4, 1987 March 7, 1988 Details
Comoros Accession: January 17, 2005 April 17, 2005 Details
Congo Declaration of Continued Application: May 8, 1962 August 15, 1960 Details
Cook Islands Accession: May 3, 2017 August 3, 2017 Details
Costa Rica Accession: March 3, 1978 June 10, 1978 Details
Côte d’Ivoire Accession: July 8, 1961 January 1, 1962 Details
Croatia Declaration / Notification of Succession: July 28, 1992 October 8, 1991 Details
Cuba Accession: November 20, 1996 February 20, 1997 Details
Cyprus Declaration of Continued Application: February 24, 1964 August 16, 1960 Details
Czech Republic Declaration of Continued Application: December 18, 1992 January 1, 1993 Details
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Accession: January 28, 2003 April 28, 2003 Details
Democratic Republic of the Congo Declaration of Continued Application: October 8, 1963 June 30, 1960 Details
Denmark Accession: June 13, 1903 July 1, 1903 Details
Djibouti Accession: February 13, 2002 May 13, 2002 Details
Dominica Accession: May 7, 1999 August 7, 1999 Details
Dominican Republic Accession: September 24, 1997 December 24, 1997 Details
Ecuador Accession: July 8, 1991 October 9, 1991 Details
Egypt Accession: March 2, 1977 June 7, 1977 Details
El Salvador Accession: November 18, 1993 February 19, 1994 Details
Equatorial Guinea Accession: March 26, 1997 June 26, 1997 Details
Estonia Accession: July 26, 1994 October 26, 1994 Details
Fiji Declaration of Continued Application: December 1, 1971 October 10, 1970 Details
Finland Accession: March 23, 1928 April 1, 1928 Details
France September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Gabon Accession: December 19, 1961 March 26, 1962 Details
Gambia Accession: December 7, 1992 March 7, 1993 Details
Georgia Accession: February 16, 1995 May 16, 1995 Details
Germany September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Ghana Accession: July 11, 1991 October 11, 1991 Details
Greece Accession: November 9, 1920 November 9, 1920 Details
Grenada Accession: June 22, 1998 September 22, 1998 Details
Guatemala Accession: April 28, 1997 July 28, 1997 Details
Guinea Accession: August 13, 1980 November 20, 1980 Details
Guinea-Bissau Accession: April 18, 1991 July 22, 1991 Details
Guyana Accession: July 25, 1994 October 25, 1994 Details
Haiti Accession: October 11, 1995 January 11, 1996 Details
Holy See Accession: July 19, 1935 September 12, 1935 Details
Honduras Accession: October 24, 1989 January 25, 1990 Details
Hungary Accession: February 14, 1922 February 14, 1922 Details
Iceland Accession: June 30, 1947 September 7, 1947 Details
India Declaration of Continued Application: April 23, 1928 April 1, 1928 Details
Indonesia Accession: June 5, 1997 September 5, 1997 Details
Ireland Accession: October 5, 1927 October 5, 1927 Details
Israel Accession: December 14, 1949 March 24, 1950 Details
Italy September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Jamaica Accession: September 28, 1993 January 1, 1994 Details
Japan Accession: April 18, 1899 July 15, 1899 Details
Jordan Accession: April 28, 1999 July 28, 1999 Details
Kazakhstan Accession: January 12, 1999 April 12, 1999 Details
Kenya Accession: March 11, 1993 June 11, 1993 Details
Kuwait Accession: September 2, 2014 December 2, 2014 Details
Kyrgyzstan Accession: April 8, 1999 July 8, 1999 Details
Lao People’s Democratic Republic Accession: December 14, 2011 March 14, 2012 Details
Latvia Accession: May 11, 1995 August 11, 1995 Details
Lebanon Accession: February 19, 1946 September 30, 1947 Details
Lesotho Accession: June 27, 1989 September 28, 1989 Details
Liberia Accession: December 8, 1988 March 8, 1989 Details
Libya Accession: June 28, 1976 September 28, 1976 Details
Liechtenstein Accession: July 20, 1931 July 30, 1931 Details
Lithuania Accession: September 14, 1994 December 14, 1994 Details
Luxembourg Accession: June 20, 1888 June 20, 1888 Details
Madagascar Declaration of Continued Application: February 11, 1966 January 1, 1966 Details
Malawi Accession: July 12, 1991 October 12, 1991 Details
Malaysia Accession: June 28, 1990 October 1, 1990 Details
Mali Declaration of Continued Application: March 19, 1962 March 19, 1962 Details
Malta Declaration of Continued Application: May 29, 1968 September 21, 1964 Details
Mauritania Accession: October 16, 1972 February 6, 1973 Details
Mauritius Accession: February 9, 1989 May 10, 1989 Details
Mexico Accession: May 9, 1967 June 11, 1967 Details
Micronesia (Federated States of) Accession: July 7, 2003 October 7, 2003 Details
Monaco Accession: May 30, 1889 May 30, 1889 Details
Mongolia Accession: December 12, 1997 March 12, 1998 Details
Montenegro Declaration of Continued Application: December 4, 2006 June 3, 2006 Details
Morocco Accession: June 16, 1917 June 16, 1917 Details
Mozambique Accession: August 22, 2013 November 22, 2013 Details
Namibia Declaration of Continued Application: September 21, 1993 March 21, 1990 Details
Nepal Accession: October 11, 2005 January 11, 2006 Details
Netherlands Accession: October 9, 1912 November 1, 1912 Details
New Zealand Declaration of Continued Application: April 26, 1928 April 24, 1928 Details
Nicaragua Accession: May 23, 2000 August 23, 2000 Details
Niger Declaration of Continued Application: May 2, 1962 August 3, 1960 Details
Nigeria Accession: June 10, 1993 September 14, 1993 Details
Niue Accession: June 24, 2016 September 24, 2016 Details
Norway Accession: April 13, 1896 April 13, 1896 Details
Oman Accession: April 14, 1999 July 14, 1999 Details
Pakistan Accession: June 4, 1948 July 5, 1948 Details
Panama Accession: March 8, 1996 June 8, 1996 Details
Paraguay Accession: September 9, 1991 January 2, 1992 Details
Peru Accession: May 20, 1988 August 20, 1988 Details
Philippines Accession: June 29, 1950 August 1, 1951 Details
Poland Accession: January 28, 1920 January 28, 1920 Details
Portugal Accession: March 29, 1911 March 29, 1911 Details
Qatar Accession: April 5, 2000 July 5, 2000 Details
Republic of Korea Accession: May 21, 1996 August 21, 1996 Details
Republic of Moldova Accession: August 1, 1995 November 2, 1995 Details
Romania Accession: August 28, 1926 January 1, 1927 Details
Russian Federation Accession: December 9, 1994 March 13, 1995 Details
Rwanda Accession: November 3, 1983 March 1, 1984 Details
Saint Kitts and Nevis Accession: January 3, 1995 April 9, 1995 Details
Saint Lucia Accession: May 21, 1993 August 24, 1993 Details
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Accession: May 29, 1995 August 29, 1995 Details
Samoa Accession: April 21, 2006 July 21, 2006 Details
Sao Tome and Principe Accession: March 14, 2016 June 14, 2016 Details
Saudi Arabia Accession: December 11, 2003 March 11, 2004 Details
Senegal Accession: June 30, 1962 August 25, 1962 Details
Serbia Declaration of Continued Application: September 19, 2006 April 27, 1992 Details
Singapore Accession: September 21, 1998 December 21, 1998 Details
Slovakia Declaration of Continued Application: December 30, 1992 January 1, 1993 Details
Slovenia Declaration of Continued Application: June 12, 1992 June 25, 1991 Details
South Africa Declaration of Continued Application: October 3, 1928 October 3, 1928 Details
Spain September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Sri Lanka Declaration of Continued Application: July 20, 1959 February 4, 1948 Details
Sudan Accession: September 28, 2000 December 28, 2000 Details
Suriname Accession: November 16, 1976 February 23, 1977 Details
Swaziland Accession: September 14, 1998 December 14, 1998 Details
Sweden Accession: July 8, 1904 August 1, 1904 Details
Switzerland September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Syrian Arab Republic Accession: March 11, 2004 June 11, 2004 Details
Tajikistan Accession: December 9, 1999 March 9, 2000 Details
Thailand Accession: June 17, 1931 July 17, 1931 Details
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Declaration / Notification of Succession: July 23, 1993 September 8, 1991 Details
Togo Accession: January 28, 1975 April 30, 1975 Details
Tonga Accession: March 14, 2001 June 14, 2001 Details
Trinidad and Tobago Accession: May 16, 1988 August 16, 1988 Details
Tunisia September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
Turkey Accession: October 27, 1951 January 1, 1952 Details
Turkmenistan Accession: February 29, 2016 May 29, 2016 Details
Tuvalu Accession: March 2, 2017 June 2, 2017 Details
Ukraine Accession: July 25, 1995 October 25, 1995 Details
United Arab Emirates Accession: April 14, 2004 July 14, 2004 Details
United Kingdom September 9, 1886 Ratification: September 5, 1887 December 5, 1887 Details
United Republic of Tanzania Accession: April 25, 1994 July 25, 1994 Details
United States of America Accession: November 16, 1988 March 1, 1989 Details
Uruguay Accession: June 7, 1967 July 10, 1967 Details
Uzbekistan Accession: January 19, 2005 April 19, 2005 Details
Vanuatu Accession: September 27, 2012 December 27, 2012 Details
Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) Accession: September 20, 1982 December 30, 1982 Details
Viet Nam Accession: July 26, 2004 October 26, 2004 Details
Yemen Accession: April 14, 2008 July 14, 2008 Details
Zambia Accession: September 13, 1991 January 2, 1992 Details
Zimbabwe Declaration / Notification of Succession: September 18, 1981 April 18, 1980 Details

India became a member of Berne Convention on 1st April 1928 whereas United States of America joined Berne Convention on 16th November 1988. Other countries like Malaysia (28th June 1990), Singapore (21st September 1998), China (10th July 1992), and United Kingdom (5th September 1887) became a member of Berne Convention on the respective dates.

 

How do you get a copyright on something?
How to register a copyright?

Copyright filing in India

Filing of application (offline/online) along with fee (Demand draft/ online payment/ postal order)

http://copyright.gov.in/frmFeeDetailsShow.aspx

S.No.For an application for COMPULSORY LICENSE :

For a license to republish a Literary, Dramatic, Musical or Artistic work (Sections 31, 31A,31B* and 32A) Rs. 5,000/- per work

For a license to communicate an any work to the public by Broadcast(Section 31(1)(b)) Rs. 40,000/- per applicant/per sataton

For license to republish a Cinematograph Film (Section 31) Rs. 15,000/- per work

For a license to republish a sound recording (Section 31) Rs. 10,000/- per work

For a license to perform any work in public (Section 31) Rs. 5,000/- per work

For a license to publish or communicate to the public the work or translation (Section 31A) Rs. 5,000/- per work

For a license to publish any work in any format useful for person with disability (Section 31 B) Rs. 2,000/- per work

For an application for a license to produce and publish a translation of a Literary or Dramatic work in any Language  (Section 32 & 32-A ) Rs. 5,000/- per work

copyrights, trademarks, and patents are frequently used interchangeably, they are different forms of protection for intellectual property
What Is a Copyright?

For an application for registration or copyright in a:

(a) Literary, Dramatic, Musical or Artistic workRs. 500/- per work

(b) Provided that in respect of a Literary or Artistic work which is used or is capable of being used in relation to any goods (Section 45) Rs. 2,000/- per work

For an application for change in particulars of copyright entered in the Register of Copyrights in respect of a:

(a)Literary, Dramatic, Musical or Artistic workRs. 200/- per work

(b)Provided that in respect of a literary or Artistic work which is used or is capable of being used in relation to any goods (Section 45) Rs. 1,000/- per work

For an application for registration of Copyright in a Cinematograph Film (Section 45) Rs. 5,000/- per work

For an application for registration of change in particulars of copyright entered in the Register of Copyrights in respect of Cinematograph film (Section 45) Rs. 2,000/- per work

For an application for registration of copyright in a Sound Recording (Section 45) Rs. 2,000/- per work

For an application for registration of changes in particulars of copyright entered in the Register of Copyrights in respect of Sound Recording (Section 45) Rs. 1,000/- per work

For taking extracts from the indexes (Section 47) Rs. 500/- per work

For taking extracts from the Register of Copyrights (Section 47) Rs. 500/- per work

For a certified copy of an extract from the Register of Copyrights of the indexes (Section 47) Rs. 500/- per copy

For a certified copy of any other public document in the custody of the Register of Copyright or Secretary of the Copyright Board Rs. 500/- per Copy

For an application for prevention of importation of infringing copies (Section 53) per place of entry Rs. 1,200/- per work 

List of documents required

(Reproduced from http://copyright.gov.in/Default.asp

 

How do you get a copyright on something?
Copyright: Definition, Protections, & Duration
Artistic Work 2 Copies of work  

DD/IPO of Rs. (as applicable) per work  

NOC from author if applicant is different from author.  

NOC from publisher if work published and publisher is different from applicant.  Search Certificate from Trademark Office (TM -60) if the work is being used on goods or capable of being used on the goods.  

NOC from person whose photograph appears on the work.  

If the application is being filed through attorney , a specific Power of Attorney in original duly signed by the applicant and accepted by the attorney

Cinematograph Film 2 Copies of work  

DD/IPO of Rs. (as applicable) per work  

NOC from various copyright holders or copy of agreement (deed of assignment).  

NOC from publisher if work published and publisher is different from applicant.  

If the application is being filed through attorney , a specific Power of Attorney in original duly signed by the applicant and accepted by the attorney

Music 2 Copies of work (Graphical Notes)  

DD/IPO of Rs. (as applicable) per work  

NOC from publisher if work published and publisher is different from applicant.  

NOC from author if applicant is other than author.  

If the application is being filed through attorney , a specific Power of Attorney in original duly signed by the applicant and accepted by the attorney

Literary/Dramatic 2 Copies of work  DD/IPO of Rs. (as applicable) per work  

NOC from publisher if applicant is other than publisher and work is published.  

NOC from author if applicant is other than author.

If the application is being filed through attorney , a specific Power of Attorney in original duly signed by the applicant and accepted by the attorney

Sound Recording 2 Copies of work  DD/IPO of Rs. (as applicable) per work  

NOC from various copyright holders or copy of agreement (deed of assignment).  

NOC from publisher if work published and publisher is different from applicant.

If the application is being filed through attorney , a specific Power of Attorney in original duly signed by the applicant and accepted by the attorney

Software 2 Copies of work  DD/IPO of Rs. (as applicable) per work  

NOC from author if author is different from applicant.  

NOC from publisher if work is published and publisher is different from applicant.  

If the application is being filed through attorney , a specific Power of Attorney in original duly signed by the applicant and accepted by the attorney  Source code and object code of work for verification.

Copyright Registering Body India

Department Of Industrial Policy & Promotion Ministry of Commerce and Industry Address- G-30, August Kranti Bhawan Bhikaji Cama Place New Delhi-110066

Email Address  copyright@nic.in

Telephone No.- 011-26100118,19

Copyright filing in US

Requirements– A complete application form, application fee (non-refundable), copy of the work being registered.

Application Fee-

https://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ04.pdf

Registration Procedure-

https://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf#page=7

Notice:

Footnote:

Copyright Registering body US

U.S Copyright Office

Location- Library of Congress,

James Madison Memorial Building,

101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, D.C.

Websitehttp://www.copyright.gov