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Replying to TRADEMARK Objections

trademark objection reply fees, trademark objection letter, trademark examination report reply format,

 A Trademark is a type of intellectual property protection, under which a word, phrase, visual symbol and/or design used by a company to distinguish its goods or services from other similar goods or services originating from a different company can be protected. A trademark registration will confer an exclusive right and legal certainty to the use of registered trademark by the right holder.

 Trademark protection can be obtained by filing a trademark application with the relevant Trade Mark Registrar in the prescribed format and paying the required fees.

 Once a trademark application is filed, the trademark registration application will be allocated to a Trademark Officer in the Trademark Registrar Office. The Trademark Officer would then process the application and analyse it. The Trademark Officer will give its opinion about the Trademark in the form of an “Examination Report”. Based on the Examination Report, the trademark application is published in the trademark journal or an objection is raised for registration of Trademark.

 If the trademark registration application is objected by the Trademark Officer, the trademark applicant has the right to submit a written reply for the objections raised within 1 month from the date of receipt of examination report. The trademark examination reply should include reasons and evidences along with the supporting documents to prove the distinctiveness of the trademark and as to why the trademark should be registered. The application is allowed to be published in the Trademark Journal before registration only if the Trademark officer is satisfied by the reply. Thus, the reply to the Trademark examination report should address all the concerns raised by the Trademark Officer.

The Trademark Officer raises an objection for registration of trademark under Section 9 and Section 11 of “The Trade Marks Act, 1999”.

 

Section 9 of The Trade Marks Act, 1999 states the Absolute grounds for refusal of registration—

 

(1) The trade marks—

(a) which are devoid of any distinctive character, that is to say, not capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one person from those of another person;

(b) which consist exclusively of marks or indications which may serve in trade to designate the kind, quality, quantity, intended purpose, values, geographical origin or the time of production of the goods or rendering of the service or other characteristics of the goods or service;

(c) which consist exclusively of marks or indications which have become customary in the current language or in the bona fide and established practices of the trade, shall not be registered:

Provided that a trade mark shall not be refused registration if before the date of application for registration it has acquired a distinctive character as a result of the use made of it or is a well-known trade mark.

(2) A mark shall not be registered as a trade mark if—

(a) it is of such nature as to deceive the public or cause confusion;

(b) it contains or comprises of any matter likely to hurt the religious susceptibilities of any class or section of the citizens of India;

(c) it comprises or contains scandalous or obscene matter;

(d) its use is prohibited under the Emblems and Names (Prevention of Improper Use) Act,1950 (12 of 1950).

(3) A mark shall not be registered as a trade mark if it consists exclusively of—

(a) the shape of goods which results from the nature of the goods themselves; or

(b) the shape of goods which is necessary to obtain a technical result; or

(c) the shape which gives substantial value to the goods. \

Section 11 of The Trade Marks Act, 1999 states the Relative grounds for refusal of registration—

(1) A trade mark shall not be registered if, because of—

(a) its identity with an earlier trade mark and similarity of goods or services covered by the trade mark; or

(b) its similarity to an earlier trade mark and the identity or similarity of the goods or services covered by the trade mark,

there exists a likelihood of confusion on the part of the public, which includes the likelihood of association with the earlier trade mark.

(2) A trade mark which—

(a) is identical with or similar to an earlier trade mark; and

(b) is to be registered for goods or services which are not similar to those for which the earlier trade mark is registered in the name of a different proprietor, shall not be registered if or to the extent the earlier trade mark is a well-known trade mark in India and the use of the later mark without due cause would take unfair advantage of or be detrimental to the distinctive character or repute of the earlier trade mark.

(3) A trade mark shall not be registered if, or to the extent that, its use in India is liable to be prevented—

(a) by virtue of any law in particular the law of passing off protecting an unregistered trade mark used in the course of trade; or

(b) by virtue of law of copyright.

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(4) Nothing in this section shall prevent the registration of a trade mark where the proprietor of the earlier trade mark or other earlier right consents to the registration, and in such case the Registrar may register the mark under special circumstances under section 12.

(5) A trade mark shall not be refused registration on the grounds specified in sub-sections (2) and (3), unless objection on any one or more of those grounds is raised in opposition proceedings by the proprietor of the earlier trade mark.

(6) The Registrar shall, while determining whether a trade mark is a well-known trade mark, take into account any fact which he considers relevant for determining a trade mark as a well-known trade mark including—

(i) the knowledge or recognition of that trade mark in the relevant section of the public including knowledge in India obtained as a result of promotion of the trade mark;

(ii) the duration, extent and geographical area of any use of that trade mark;

(iii) the duration, extent and geographical area of any promotion of the trade mark, including advertising or publicity and presentation, at fairs or exhibition of the goods or services to which the trade mark applies;

(iv) the duration and geographical area of any registration of or any application for registration of that trade mark under this Act to the extent that they reflect the use or recognition of the trade mark;

(v) the record of successful enforcement of the rights in that trade mark, in particular the extent to which the trade mark has been recognised as a well-known trade mark by any court or Registrar under that record.

(7) The Registrar shall, while determining as to whether a trade mark is known or recognised in a relevant section of the public for the purposes of sub-section (6), take into account—

(i) the number of actual or potential consumers of the goods or services;

(ii) the number of persons involved in the channels of distribution of the goods or services

(iii) the business circles dealing with the goods or services, to which that trade mark applies.

(8) Where a trade mark has been determined to be well known in at least one relevant section of the public in India by any court or Registrar, the Registrar shall consider that trade mark as a well-known trade mark for registration under this Act.

(9) The Registrar shall not require as a condition, for determining whether a trade mark is a well-known trade mark, any of the following, namely:—

(i) that the trade mark has been used in India;

(ii) that the trade mark has been registered;

(iii) that the application for registration of the trade mark has been filed in India;

(iv) that the trade mark— (a) is well-known in; or (b) has been registered in; or (c) in respect of which an application for registration has been filed in, any jurisdiction other than India; or

(v) that the trade mark is well-known to the public at large in India.

(10) While considering an application for registration of a trade mark and opposition filed in respect thereof, the Registrar shall—

(i) protect a well-known trade mark against the identical or similar trademarks;

(ii) take into consideration the bad faith involved either of the applicant or the opponent affecting the right relating to the trade mark.

(11) Where a trade mark has been registered in good faith disclosing the material informations to the Registrar or where right to a trade mark has been acquired through use in good faith before the commencement of this Act, then, nothing in this Act shall prejudice the validity of the registration of that trade mark or right to use that trade mark on the ground that such trade mark is identical with or similar to a well-known trade mark.

Thus, if the Trademark officer has raised an objection under Section 9 or Section 11 of the Trade Mark Act, 1999, the reply must contain the judicial precedent and should prove the point with proper evidence.

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Step by Step Guide to Get Trademark Registered in India

Step-wise Guide for Registering Trademark in India

Trademark Registration is a necessary step if you own a business or want to own a business. Your business name, identity, brand, logo, image etc. can be protected  by registering Trademark for your business.

Apply for TM Registration and discuss your brand strategy and understand importance of brand, logo and tagline with expert consultants at Tech Corp International Strategist India TCIS, India.

Get your Trademark Registered in India by hiring professional trademark lawyer in India. Currently, a trademark is registered in less than a month.

Documents required for filing a TradeMark Application in India:

  1. A copy of Trademark or logo
  2. Details of the applicant like name, address and nationality and the state of incorporation for company
  3. Goods or services provided by the company  
  4. Date of first use of the trademark in India, if used by you prior to applying.
  5. Power of attorney to be signed by the applicant

So, by following the ten step process get Trademark Registered in India in 30 days:

Coin a brand name for trademark registration

Select the appropriate Trademark class for your brand

Avoid filing multi class trademark application in class 99

Conduct a trademark search online at Indian Trademark website

Expedite the digitization process by filing online trademark

Get digital signature for signing online trademark forms

Get proprietor code for filing trademark in India

File TM-1 Form for Trademark Registration in India Attach Stamped Power of Attorney TM-48 (POA) while filing the trademark in India

Wait for formal response from trademark office and reply trademark objection within one month of receiving the formal response.

Trademark Services by TCIS 

TRADE MARK| BRAND PROTECTION SERVICE IN INDIA

Brand Opinion Services

Trade mark  Clearance Searches

Filing of trademark applications, registration procedure

Trade mark Renewal

Trade mark opposition

Trade mark rectification

Action of infringement and passing off

Assignment, licenses and transmission, drafting deed form

Registration of trademark assignment

For more details please contact us at legal_desk@patentbusinessidea.com

Brand protection by Trademarks

 

Do you need a trademark for a logo? Can you patent a logo?
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Trademark of Logo

How do I get a logo trademarked?

“It’s all in the name”!

Designed a logo to represent your business?

How to protect the design of the logo and the business behind it using the Trademark Law?

Before addressing how to trademark your business logo, we should define the terms “trademark” and “logo.”

The terms “Logo” and “trademark” are used interchangeably but they do actually differ slightly from each other. “A logo can be a trademark but a trademark cannot be considered to be a logo”.

A trademark is a unique name, symbol, phrase, motto, or graphic design that is specific to a company name, or its products and services and is used to distinguish the products of one seller from the other. The symbol ‘™’ designates that  the name, symbol or word is a trademark-ed property belonging to a particular company and that specific drawing, logo, or phrase cannot be copied or used by any other business or person, unless specific authorization is given by the trademark owner.

A logo is a brand identity for representing businesses. A logo should represent the the characteristic spirit  manifested in the attitudes and aspirations of the company it stands for. Sometimes people identify the company through the logo; although they might have forgotten the name. Registration of the logo as a trademark makes it a legal document which can be used in the court of law in case of brand infringement.

Selecting trademark for startup business can be tricky but at the same time rewarding to the startup. It is important to do proper research before filing for trademark for startup business in India.

Trademark of a brand has a lasting effect on its consumers. As a business owner, the startup thinks passionately about naming their new business, but while doing so, due consideration should be given to the following two points:

(a) “Unique & Novel” Trademark: The trademark should be new and unique.

(b) Non-conflicting to competitor in same field: The trademark should not conflict with existing trade names who have registered trademarks.

Business names, brand names, logos and taglines are protected legally by way of trademarks, and in case of conflicting names, it might result in a trademark infringement suit. Trademark for startup business should be unique to the business offering.

It is very important to name a business properly. Inorder to highlight the importance of naming a business, we will take an example of International Trademark Infringement.

A South Korean fried chicken restaurant recently lost a trademark battle with designer “Louis Vuitton”. The restaurant’s name- “Louis Vuiton Dak” was too similar to Louis Vuitton. In addition to the name infringement, the restaurant’s logo and packaging closely mirrored the designer’s iconic imagery.

The restaurant ultimately changed the name to “LOUISVUI TONDAK” and was hit with another 14.5 million fine for non-compliance.

Therefore, as may be observed from the above case study, trademark for startup business should be unique, selecting a unique business name and legally protecting it by way of trademarks is very important. Companies can avoid expensive legal battles by avoiding mirroring their brand closely after another brand, even if the products and business strategy have nothing in common.

If a business involves multiple brands, a strong trademark strategy is crucial to manage them. It is advisable to keep business name different from brand name.

In accordance with Indian Trademark Law, it is not mandatory to file for a trademark, but it is highly advisable to file trademark for startup business, register a trademark for the name of your business as well as for the brand names of your products and services.

Accordingly, it is highly advisable to seek assistance from a Trademark Attorney.

Apply for TM Registration and discuss your brand strategy and understand importance of brand, logo and tagline with expert consultants at Tech Corp International Strategist India TCIS, India.

IF YOUR STRATEGY AND DOCUMENTATION ARE IN PLACE WE GET”YOUR” TRADEMARK REGISTERED IN TWO- THREE WEEKS.

Trademark Services

 

8 things about Sarahah app you must know before downloading
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“Sarahah(.com)”- Take home lesson for Entrepreneurs

Take home lesson for Entrepreneurs- Sarahah(.com)

“Sarahah” has been Viral. The app has been a trend in few days. You would have surely come across this app named Sarahah.com in some way or the other unless you are living in a nutshell!!!

“Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life — think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success.” –  Swami Vivekananda

Sarahah was created to take positive feedback anonymously. The sharing of ‘feedbacks’ on social media & the user engagement clearly shows the Virality of this app. In a way it brought out multiple sides of human sentiments.

From “constructive feedback” to “being a victim of cyber bullying” you would have seen it all in past couple of hours.“It’s not about ideas. It’s about making ideas happen.” Sarahah has been able to engage users universally, but there are certain take home lessons for startups that they should take care of while building a product or service. Building a startup is a very tough and long term process. You have to think for long term Sustainability and Scalability.

“Entrepreneurship is neither a science nor an art. It is a practice.” – Peter Drucker.

What we can learn from success of Sarahah.com “Do’s”

1) WOW Marketing (Word-OF-Mouth)The purpose of a business is to create a customer who creates “customers”.”WOW Marketing” is when a consumer’s interest for a company’s product or service is reflected in their daily dialogues. Best of the companies in the world have used this strategy and this is the best marketing strategy a product can get. So you need to create “a product so good that after using it, people would share it in their social circles.

If you see it in the case of Sarahah- The trend was set by some early users who wanted to take feedback about themselves by sharing good or interesting feedbacks on Facebook. This encouraged other users to try this app!!! 

2. User-friendliness of the product/service

One thing that should always be considered is the userfriendliness of the product. The product should be so simple and instinctive that it can be used with an equal proficiency by a child or an adult wheather or not the individual is a “Tech-Savvy”

It’s easy to make things look hard but hard to make things look easy.

Most of the startups want to build a product with multiple features to enable more users to use it. But a product loaded with multiple features would confuse the user.

Sarahah is extremely simple to use. A feedback seeker has to simply create an account and share the URL – that’s it. A feedback giver has to merely write the feedback in plain simple text.

3. Emotions make us human

“The greatest fear in the world is of the opinions of others. And the moment you are unafraid of the crowd you are no longer a sheep, you become a lion. A great roar arises in your heart, the roar of freedom.” ― Osho

Sarahah became viral because people want to take & hear positive feedback / positive things / good things about themselves as it would make them feel “valuable”. A user should be able to connect with the product/service at an emotional level. In that case he/she will surely use it – atleast for once.

What NOT TO DO while building a Startup.

1). Build Real Value for the Customer 

While building a startup take care that you are solving a real problem and delivering real value to the customer.

“Don’t find customers for your products, find products for your customers”

In order to build repeatitive engagement, target a group and solve some real problem that your target group is facing. Websites like Sarahah are build to capitalize Human Emotions. They will be able to attract a lot of people to use them but for a small period of time. But as an entrepreneur, you should think whether you want mere Users or Customer?

“Be genuine. Be remarkable. Be worth connecting with”.

2. Trends Come & Go, Startups Stay 

When you are building a company think about the “long term goals”. User Retention, Active Users and Repeat Rate are very important factors for a startup. Make sure that your product/service is able to engage users for a longer period of time and there is a repeat rate, else your product might go viral, but will be useless in the long term. Just like Sarahah, 100s of things go ‘viral’ and become popular very quickly, but then they sputter out with the same speed.

“Strive not to be a success but rather to be of value”- Albert Einstein

3. Money is the Oxygen for your company

A business is nothing without its clients. Whether you provide product or services, you won’t survive unless individuals or other businesses retain their interest and are willing to pay to use the product / service continuously.

Monetization happens when you are able to deliver real value to the customers because the customers will never hesitate in paying for the value he/she is receiving.

“Making money isn’t hard in itself …. What’s hard is to earn it doing something worth devoting one’s life to”- Carlos Ruiz

In the haste of building a company, early stage entrepreneurs do one common mistake! They do not think about building a rock solid revenue model. Even though apps like Sarahah go viral but they don’t have a monetization model built in them which is ok for a short period of time but it’s deadly in long term.

“The Entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it and exploits it as an opportunity”- Peter Drucker

The effort required to launch a new venture can seem daunting. Do your research, pick everyone’s brain, find a mentor that’s experienced in entrepreneurship, review business case studies and focus on delivering real value to the customers.

At Tech Corp International Strategist (TCIS), we help Startups to Raise Funds & Assist Foreign Companies to find Right Business Partner in India. We assist enterprises to enter INDIA and find RIGHT Angels, and Venture Capitals in Malaysia, Singapore, US, UK, Japan and India. We believe that for protecting your innovation in India, your startup idea and our intellect is the perfect combination.

Every business has a #strategy. We at TCIS facilitate the process of identifying Key issues and help amplify business goals of any business (short term goals and long term goals). Everything is simple we tend to complicate and use heavy words to prove our point.

Co Author-

Aanchal Verma

Associate at TCIS

 

European trademark law effective efficient
brand trademark, European Union Trademark Reforms, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGY, strategic business advice, trademark filling in India

European Union Trademark Reforms

How to reforms laws?

Reform the world is to reform the nation and reform the nation is to reform the laws.

The European Union trademark reform that has been introduced in order to bring a substantial and an important change to the original and unabridged EU trademark system that existed since 1996. The newly amended EU trademark law is referred to as the Regulation (EU) 2015/2424 which was passed in December 2015 and on March 23, 2016 the first part of its regulation came into force. On October 1, 2017 the remaining provisions will come into effect.

This change in the trademark law will bring an important change not only to the community trademarks that allows to obtain with a single application a trademark valid in all the territory of the European Union but also for national trademark owners in the European Union (EU).

Before dealing with what these reforms have in the bag for trademark owners in the EU, we first need to shed some light on the legislation that are behind the whole reform unit. There are two legislation namely, the amended Community Trademark Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2015/2424) which provides for the rules and regulations that are to be compelled with and which came into force on 23 March 2016. The second legislation is the new Trademarks Directive (Directive (EU) 2015/2436) intends to balance the national trademark systems of the EU member state and which came into force on 13th January 2016.

This reform consists of various innovations, including the alteration to the fee structure, criteria concerning the registration of trademarks and the procedural issue as well as alterations relevant to infringement proceedings and custom seizures. The new regulation is applicable to all the EUTM (European Union Trademark) registrations and as a result of this many trademark owners who have their trademark stipulation contain class headings from the nice specifications have to take actions in order to prevent a cutback in their protection.

According to Article 28 EUTMR class headings of the class specifications that are mentioned in the EU trademark specifications will only cover the goods and the services which are covered by the literal meaning of the respective words. Further the EUTMR has also proposed a new European Union certification mark in Article 74a-74k EUTMR and the applications for such marks can only be filled after 1st October 2017. Under this proposal the owner of an EU certification mark will not act as the supplier of the goods and services in the market but will be responsible for certifying and monitoring the qualities of goods of services.

Along with the innovations there are changes such as:

The Community Trademark (CTM) is renamed to the European Trademark (EUTM) and the office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) has become the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO).

Trademark applicants have to no longer represent marks graphically. This change makes it easier for the non-traditional signs such as sound and smell to be registered easily.

The trademarks are followed by a new fee structure and the renewals have indeed become generously cheaper but the trademark applications which are containing 3 or more classes have increased. Further there are concerns that arose with these innovations and changes such as the grounds for refusal and invalidity of the trademark.

 VARIOUS GROUNDS OF EU REFORMS

Absolute grounds for Refusal or Invalidity: Signs which dwell completely of other characteristics of which results from the nature of the goods or is necessary in order to obtain a technical result or give a generous value to the goods, may not be registered. These absolute grounds cannot be affected on evidence of acquired uniqueness and has been drawn out to include ‘other characteristics’ apart from shape.Additional grounds such as designations of origin, geographical indications, and traditional terms for wine, traditional specialties guaranteed and plant varieties have been added for refusal.

Relative grounds for Refusal or Invalidity: The owner of a designation of origin or a geographical indication can depend upon these rights in order to prevent the registration and use of a consecutive trademarks.

Marks with a reputation: This ground has been introduced in order to prevent the registration of the trademark where the goods and services are same. This ground can be based upon a reputation claim, irrespective of the fact whether the goods and services concealed by the inimical applications are similar or dissimilar to the goods or services for which reputation is claimed and where such use would lead to an unfair advantage of or to the modesty of the earlier mark.

Infringement: Using a registered trademark as a trade or company name is a specific infringement.

At the end trademark reforms include some large-scale alterations that will definitely restore and modernize the European Union trademark law and will ensure greater balance in trademark practices and procedures across the European Union. It will strength the rights of the trademark owners while bringing a bright prospective towards the working of it.

IF YOUR STRATEGY AND DOCUMENTATION ARE IN PLACE WE GET”YOUR” TRADEMARK REGISTERED IN TWO- THREE WEEKS

Apply for TM Registration and discuss your brand strategy  and understand importance of brand, logo and tagline with expert consultants at Tech Corp International Strategist India TCIS, India.

Locations: Delhi, Gurgaon, Noida, Mumbai, Banglore

IF YOUR STRATEGY AND DOCUMENTATION ARE IN PLACE WE GET”YOUR” TRADEMARK REGISTERED IN TWO- THREE WEEKS

 We at Tech Corp International Strategist India(TCIS) provide Trademark services:

Trademark Office Action Responses

We at TCIS,India evaluate your office action after client discussion and understanding his business quotes and let you know if there is a fair chance to get your trademark application approved. If you decide to hire our trademark lawyers / trademark attorneys at TCIS to draft a response to the office action, cost effective flat rates are available.

As experienced trademark attorneys we at TCIS are well versed in responding to office action letters issued by trademark examining attorneys at the Indian Patent Office(IPO) and Indian Trademark Office.

Trademark Monitoring Services

We at TCIS,India also offers trademark monitoring services for OUR  clients. This service is designed to protect the client’s trademark by periodically reviewing the records of the Indian Patent Office(IPO) and Indian Trademark Office, and additional sources, depending on the monitoring service requested, for applications to register, or use of, confusingly similar marks.

Other Services

The firm offers a variety of services, including representation in cancellation and opposition proceedings at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board. 

CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE CONSULTATION WITH TRADEMARK ATTORNEY  at 011 6654 4992 OR SEND AN EMAIL TO legal_desk@patentbusinessidea.com

When you contact Trademark attorney at TCIS,India whether by phone or email, you can expect to receive prompt, professional, efficient and courteous service.

Clients of the firm enjoy the following:

  • Free initial trademark consultation with an experienced trademark attorney
  • Review of office actions by an experienced trademark attorney                
  • Trademark attorney personal attention to their matters                                        
  • Firm ideology of involvement that requires “going the extra mile”                      
  • Firm policy to return client phone calls and respond to emails immediately whenever practical                                                                                                  
  • Cost-effective flat rates 

OUR CLIENTS ARE LOCATED THROUGHOUT THE WORLD INDIA,UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, CHINA, DENMARK, ECUADOR, HONG KONG, MALAYSIA, SINGAPORE, INDIA, ITALY, INDONESIA, SOUTH AFRICA, SOUTH KOREA, SWEDEN, FRANCE, SWITZERLAND,  U.A.E. ,  UK.  

Co Author

Food Strategy | Foodservice Design food culture strategy

Anshika Bhardwaj

Food Law Strategist, Patent Associate at Tech Corp International Strategist *Startup India Expert Tech Corp International Strategist *Startup India Expert

IF YOUR STRATEGY AND DOCUMENTATION ARE IN PLACE WE GET"YOUR" TRADEMARK REGISTERED IN TWO- THREE WEEKS